Latest Posts by Date

Latest Posts by Date

4/12/2017

Revolver Only at SLPSA

To those who have inquired about shooting a revolver in competition.  Several shooters are considering holding a revolver only monthly match at the SLPSA range. We would compete under I.C.O.R.E. rules and scoring. At this time an I.C.O.R.E. membership would not be required.
For further information or comments please contact Roger Mousley at mousley50@msn.com.

4/06/2017

Addemdum to the 2014 USPSA Handgun Competition Rules, February 2014. (PCC)

Addendum to the 2014 USPSA Handgun Competition Rules, February 2014.

Pistol Caliber Carbine

All references to “handgun” in the current edition of the rule book are deemed to apply to PCC as well, except where PCC is noted in the rules.

All references to “strong hand” and “weak hand” in the current edition of the rule book apply to PCC as follows: Strong Hand will require the PCC to be shouldered on the strong hand side, trigger pulled with the strong hand. Both hands may be on the gun. Weak Hand will require the PCC to be shouldered on the weak side, trigger pulled with the weak hand. Both hands may be on the gun.

NO UPRANGE STARTS WHILE HOLDING THE CARBINE.
NOTE: This applies to classifier requirements in all instances.

PCC 5.1.12 See appendix D8. All other handgun equipment rules apply to PCC

PCC 5.2.1 Except when within the boundaries of a safety area, or when under the supervision and direct command of a Range Officer, competitors must carry their pistol caliber carbine:

PCC 5.2.1.1 Detachable magazines removed.

PCC 5.2.1.2 Competitors must use a chamber safety flag, or clear chamber device, that is easily visible externally to the gun when transporting from vehicles or stage to stage. Anyone found in violation of this rule will be immediately escorted by a Range Officer to a suitable range or safety area where appropriate corrective action shall be made.

PCC 5.2.1.3 Un-cased pistol caliber carbines must be carried shouldered or slung from the shoulder or held in the hands with the firearm reasonably vertical. Match Directors may require this to be "vertically upwards" or "vertically downwards" providing this is made clear to all competitors in a reasonable manner.

PCC 5.2.1.4 Pistol caliber carbines may be transported or stored without a slip or case, whether or not reasonably vertical, in a mobile rack or carrier as long as a chamber safety flag is used.

PCC 5.2.1.5 Match organizers may specify that carbines are allowed to be cased or uncased with the muzzle in a safe direction, i.e., into the side berm or backstop. This can be designated as a “staging area” for carbines. No handgun handling is allowed in this area. When casing/uncasing PCC’s, the muzzle must point at a side berm or backstop. Failure to point the muzzle at a side berm or back stop during casing/uncasing will result in a DQ per PCC 10.5.2.1

PCC 5.2.1.6 Transporting pistol caliber carbines from the staging area to the start position and back to the staging area from where the shooter unloads and shows clear, the gun must be carried muzzle up or muzzle down with the bolt locked open or closed on a chamber safety flag.

PCC 6.2.5.1 If a competitor fails to satisfy the equipment or other requirements for PCC division during the course of fire, he will shoot for no score.

PCC 8.1.6 PCC Ready Condition: normally the carbine will be prepared with a loaded chamber, loaded magazine inserted, and safety applied. Other ready conditions may be specified, and may be identical to the handgun ready condition, with the exception of holstering.

PCC 8.2.3 N/A for carbines. Fingers must be outside the trigger guard and the safety applied if the carbine is loaded. Competitors are not allowed to start touching or holding ammunition, loading devices, magazines, etc.

PCC 8.2.4 A course of fire may never require a competitor to start with the carbine held on the weak side.

PCC 8.2.5.1 A course of fire may never require a competitor to place his PCC in any location after the start signal. However, a competitor may place his PCC on any stable object provided this is accomplished in a safe manner and the PCC is unloaded or in a ready condition as stated in section 8.1.

8.3.7.1, PCC: “If clear, hammer down, flag”. While continuing to point the carbine safely downrange, the competitor must perform a final safety check of the carbine by closing the bolt on an empty chamber, pulling the trigger, and then inserting the chamber flag or locking the bolt open. The carbine must then be transported with the muzzle reasonably vertically up or down, while scoring is done, and then off the stage to a rack or case. Carbines may also be cased and transported off the stage in the case. When casing PCC’s, the muzzle must point at a side berm or backstop. Failure to point the muzzle at a side berm or back stop during casing will result in a DQ per PCC 10.5.2.1

PCC 10.5.2.1 Failing to point the muzzle at a side berm or back stop during casing or uncasing, or sweeping any person with the muzzle of a PCC, whether loaded or not, even if a chamber flag is inserted. Side berms/backstops may be used for casing and uncasing only. All other gun handling with the PCC, e.g., sight pictures, turning dots on/off, etc., must be accomplished in a safety area or under the direct supervision of a Range Officer.

PCC Appendix A3: All references to “strong hand” and “weak hand” in the current edition of the rule book apply to PCC as follows: Strong Hand will require the PCC to be shouldered on the strong hand side, trigger pulled with the strong hand. Both hands may be on the gun. Weak Hand will require the PCC to be shouldered on the weak side, trigger pulled with the weak hand. Both hands may be on the gun. Course descriptions may never require the carbine to be fired using only one hand.

NOTE: This applies to classifier requirements in all instances.

PCC RULES From the NROI

In the latest USPSA Downrange the Following information was provided about PCC,

PCC handling and range commands

At the recently completed Optics Nationals, we held a short session with the staff on PCC handling and range commands. As the match began, it was clear that a simple range command worked for clearing PCC’s as efficiently as handguns. There really is only one change in the range commands with these carbines, and that’s on the “If Clear…” command.

The proper command is: “If clear, hammer down, flag.” The word “flag” substitutes for the word “holster”, and should not be any harder to learn than the commands for revolver. Different, not difficult. The competitor simply closes the bolt, pulls the trigger (dry firing the PCC) , and then opens the bolt to insert the flag. After the flag is in the PCC, the muzzle goes straight up or straight down, and the range can be called clear. Simple and straightforward.

Another issue that we resolved in a fairly simple manner was casing and uncasing PCC’s. The rules allow for this at any side berm or backstop, as long as the PCC is flagged, it’s considered safe to handle (no sweeping, etc., of course). Casing and uncasing are the only things you can do at a side berm or backstop, however. If you need to fiddle with the gun, check the sights, etc., you must do that at a safe area or under the direct supervision of a range official. When the PCC competitor comes to the start position, the range command, “Make Ready” allows him to handle his carbine, load it, take a sight picture, and prepare for the stage, same as handgun. Someone needs to retain the flag for later use—we recommend the competitor hang onto it.

8.3.7.1, PCC: “If clear, hammer down, flag”. While continuing to point the carbine safely downrange, the competitor must perform a final safety check of the carbine by closing the bolt on an empty chamber, pulling the trigger, and then inserting the chamber flag or locking the bolt open. The carbine must then be transported with the muzzle reasonably vertically up or down, while scoring is done, and then off the stage to a rack or case. Carbines may also be cased and transported off the stage in the case. When casing PCC’s, the muzzle must point at a side berm or backstop. Failure to point the muzzle at a side berm or back stop during casing will result in a DQ per PCC 10.5.2.1

PCC 10.5.2.1 Failing to point the muzzle at a side berm or back stop during casing or uncasing, or sweeping any person with the muzzle of a PCC, whether loaded or not, even if a chamber flag is inserted. Side berms/backstops may be used for casing and uncasing only. All other gun handling with the PCC, e.g., sight pictures, turning dots on/off, etc., must be accomplished in a safety area or under the direct supervision of a Range Officer.

Man Down Range - NROI Report

Man down … range?

Shortly after the conclusion of the USPSA Area 1 Championship, I was sent several copies of a competitor’s POV video showing an incident where he was returning to engage some targets and one of the range officers assigned to the stage was downrange. NROI takes things like this very seriously, and I initiated an inquiry into the circumstances of the event. Luckily, nobody was hurt, the competitor was aware of his muzzle at all times, and from the video and statements by the stage crew, nobody was swept, the 180 was not broken, and the competitor was allowed to reshoot.

Our main interest in incidents like these is to be able to learn something from them, and to teach what we learned, through messages like this and in our seminars.

Here are the salient conclusions from this incident:
  • Due to some issues with the poppers the day before, one RO was making sure they were functioning properly. This is important in any match—managing your steel is crucial to keeping your stage running—but especially so with these poppers, because they activated moving targets. However, Range Officers must keep their eyes on the competitor, and not get tunnel vision on a task that can easily be done while the stage is being reset.
    • Lesson learned: watch the competitor and what’s going on at all times, until the Range Is Clear command is given, and try to anticipate the shooter’s moves—if a popper is still up, there’s a good chance he may want to shoot it again, especially (as in this case) he can see it’s up from another location or through a mesh/wire wall. “Head on a swivel” is the operative term here.
  • Although it’s been widely speculated that the stage crew was early- or split-scoring on this stage, that was not the case. The CRO was on the scoring device, and while he did get a little too far onto the stage, along with several competitors, their intent was not to do any early scoring, just get in position to get the time and begin scoring. There were a lot of people visible in that video, however.
    • Lesson learned: Range Officials-- keep everyone off the stage (using cones, a tape line, or clear directions) until the range is called clear. The few extra seconds it takes to walk across the stage is worth not having to worry about competitors being in places they shouldn’t. Competitors—stay behind the lines and off the stage until the range is called clear.
  • At around 27 seconds, as the competitor begins to retreat, you can see the RO with the timer standing behind him, and he’s beginning to back up. You can also see a wall brace directly behind that RO, and a competitor using a phone to video the competitor. What you can’t see is the RO subsequently tripping over the wall brace, while trying to avoid the videographer.
    • Lesson learned: keep everyone off the stage, behind the fault lines, while the competitor is shooting. Video is not more important than safety, and the RO needs to maintain control of his stage. If the CRO is comfortable with allowing one person on the stage to video, it’s strongly recommended that person stay behind the RO that is farthest uprange, not the RO with the timer.
    • Lesson learned: ensure that your wall braces are out of the normal traffic flow, and try to anticipate where competitors might run, even if there are no fault lines there. USPSA doesn’t mandate that you stay inside the fault lines while moving, only while shooting, so competitors may choose to solve the problem by running outside the lines. The video clearly shows a path on this stage outside the lines, with a wall brace extending out into it. NOTE: the RO falling down distracted the CRO, who was on the pad, and he didn’t    notice the third RO heading downrange. All of this added up to the “perfect storm” of having a crew member downrange on a stage that was still being shot.
  • It’s not clear in the video where the competitor’s muzzle was during the event, but it seems that it did not cover any person during this incident. The CRO states that he didn’t see the competitor sweep anyone, and that the muzzle was pointed in a safe direction when everything came to a stop. Kudos to the competitor for maintaining excellent muzzle awareness and discipline during this incident.
Because we are a dynamic sport, and one that relies on volunteers for help in setting up and running matches, the education process must be ongoing and contemporary. The Instructor corps is already incorporating this incident and the learnings from it into our seminars, but as active ROs, CROs, and RMs, please take every opportunity to educate new staffers with regard to proper stage operation.

1/30/2014

Attached is the new rule book for USPSA/NROI.  This is in a PDF format and it has had bookmarks installed for a quick search.  It is also fully searchable.

If you click on the link below, the book will open.  You can then download the PDF file for your use (Click File, then download).

USPSA/NROI Handbook